My nemesis: AngularJS docs.

Hello neglected blog!  I’ve missed you and your beautiful blue-ish pages.  I’m sorry it’s been so long since I’ve interacted with you (and my faithful 15).  I am drowning in the sea of AngularJS as I dig around the MEAN stack.

And I do mean sea.  As anyone who has attempted to read AngularJS’s docs can tell you, the experience is special in the way you describe a friend you personally love but are very aware that anyone who hasn’t spent the time getting to know them will need to invest a large amount of time disliking them to find the love.  With AngularJS docs, as you stumble upon the first page that you’re almost 100% certain any other documentation page for such a large scale project would include the information you’re looking for about the module you want to implement to make your HTML page not look like, well, this:

Yeah...learning is fun.
An uncomfortable mixture of unreadable and mid-html logic intensive that will inevitably be reused when I get back to my login page again and failing to be DRY.

When you navigate to that page in the Angular docs, it starts to answer the question, letting you step into the sea a few inches, feeling the sand between your toes, certain this is the relief your mess was looking for.  Then, as you inch in further, suddenly you realize the sea was not a sea but instead a decapitated kraken in a kiddy pool who wants nothing, as it is mindless and headless, and instead will grab you by the ankles and throw you about the bouncy edges of its plastic entrapment until you resign, regretting your trip to the sea, and crawl away onto the dried out, dying lawn.

Which then leaves me digging around blogs.  The bad thing about bloggers (such as myself), is often we don’t update for years in a row.  So while we had a solution that would have worked a few versions ago, we don’t have a great one for the moment – or even a mediocre one.  So essentially it’s like looking for the sea and finding a puddle.  Sometimes this puddle can offer a bit of relief, but more likely than not if you try to drink from it you’re going to get a disease (in my case, looking at other blogs in hopes for a bit more detail) that will result in hours wasted and no actual relief.

Then I decide the solution is to use vanilla JavaScript, but then I look back at the rest of my code and see how odd that little chunk seems in comparison to everything else.  It’s like meeting an adorable toy poodle with a very unfortunately uneven haircut that looks like missing blocks in a LEGO recreation of the Tower of Piza.  So then I hang my head in shame, crawling back to Angular, apologizing for my failures, and begging to be taken back as a negligent neophyte.

You talk to mentors, peers, anonymous strangers on the internet, but they all respond the same.  “You check Google?” because JavaScript is often perceived as the bastard child of programming languages, and so finding those dedicated to it is like trying to find a bastard child in good standing who will dedicate themselves to live on a giant wall of ice without reasonable comforts in celibacy without being forced there (i.e. Jon Snow).

Consequently, Google frequently leads to this:

xkcd reading. Wait, no. StackOverflow. I’m pretty certain DenverCoder9 moved on, tried something else, and succeeded. (Un)fortunately, I am the embodiment of perseverance (read: stubborn), so…

Unrelated, I’ve interacted with some dev bootcamps & their former students lately out of curiosity (or more realistically wondering if they had a magical instructional model that the internet and bookstores did not), and decided against pursuing it any further, at least not for the foreseeable future.  Maybe I’ll write a post about that later once I’ve finished finding some body of water of AngularJS knowledge that won’t beat me senseless in a kiddy pool, act as a massive time sink without much gain, or simply fade into nothingness.

In summary, AngularJS docs are my nemesis and why I’ve been a negligent blogger.  Google overlords, you have failed me 😥  If anyone happens to know a resource to find information on modules that isn’t painfully out of date, I would LOVE a link.  Love.  Like I would marry that link, eagerly wake up to see it every morning by my side, and grow old with it.

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My nemesis: AngularJS docs.

Getting MEAN: Building My First Web App for Realsies (and also fries are the worst food gift)

You heard me, for realsies.  I even got to self-create security violations, but thankfully as the app works now it doesn’t include usernames.  Unless you’re capable of inferring.  Then, yeah, definitely an issue.

Not THE Batman.
I AM Batman.

I love you, internet, you’re a great outlet for all of my weird.

But first?  Fries.  Three nights in a row, my husband has eaten out for dinner due to working crazy hours recently (poor, handsome bastard).  Since he knows the secret to a happy marriage is food, he brought me home left over fries.  Now, I love fries.  When I was a kid and I got fries from McDonald’s, I would happily eat those hot, salty, death sticks as soon as I could get my fingers on them.

I ate them before my cheeseburger.  Not because I didn’t love the hot, cheesy, non-compostable burger as much as the death sticks, but because the death sticks would gradually develop a weird texture and consistency as they grew cold.  This is especially true with fries that will actually decompose over time such as those that you get from a sit down restaurant.  That crispy, crunchy, delicious starchy stick just turns into a cold, lumpy, limp, soft wad.  It’s like coal in your stocking on Christmas.  Complete disappointment unless you happen to live in a town running on coal power that is running low, and for Christmas you want to give everyone around you warmth again.

So I tried a few solutions.  One: microwave.  BAD idea.  Ten times as soggy.  Two: oven.  Took way too long.  Still quite soggy.  Three: Toaster oven.  Still soggy, but warm fast.  This may have been improved if I could cook directly on the toaster rack without complete and utter fear of causing a small fire.  This may have been a fear exacerbated by the quantity of “in case of fire!” signs all over my toaster oven, I admit, but also fries slide through thin cracks quite easily so it may also just be a common sense thing that I wish didn’t exist.

I tried to think of other food gifts that came home as bad as fries.  Don’t get me wrong, anything that is a starch to which you add sauce isn’t great (burgers, sandwiches, etc), but a quick run in the toaster oven can fix all of those.  Fries though, too thin to be toaster ovened without aluminum foil.  Tis truly a shame.  If anyone has a leftover fry solution, let me know, cause I have quite a bit left.

(Side note: Dear Husband, if you happen to read this, please don’t take this to mean that I do not appreciate the lumpy food gift, but rather that I am desperately seeking a way to improve my enjoyment of the lumpy food gift as google has not provided an answer that works with the cookware we currently own.  This was a pretty close answer though.)

Now onto the programming portion of our lecture.  A couple months ago I followed a django tutorial that told me I made a web app, and once I finished the site I had loaded congratulated me for my amazing endurance for all of the 5 minutes it took, but I knew the truth.  I knew I had accomplished nothing.  When I attempted to make my own web app at that point, my brain laughed at me and called me names, so I knew I had more work ahead of me.

I landed on learning the MEAN stack because it could all be done in JavaScript.  At that point, I’d finished a majority of the Headfirst Javascript book (2 chapters away from the end, I believe?), so I really wanted to learn something that I could use to help solidify what I had learned about JavaScript.

I have an idea for a program I want to make for some of my old teacher buddies to make life a bit easier, and while I have an idea of the kinds of data I need and some of the objects, I decided it’d probably be better to start with something a little simpler.  There were a good dozen plus websites going through MEAN stack tutorials creating a to-do list (the “Hello World” of web dev), and a few making chat programs.  I decided to be awkward and make a chat program where you talk to yourself and no one else.  Why?  It felt right and had the kind of functionality I knew would be a good stepping stone into the future.  It also allowed some really awkward test cycles where I posed as Batman and used the classic trilogy throat-tearing voice every time I posted a test.  It made the whole experience feel way more epic.

Using a combination of resources including the documentation for node.js, angular.js, MongoDB and express.js, multiple websites, blogs, and video lectures from strangers, it took me about a week of working on it after work to get it together.  I learned that express.js is a beautiful blackbox where I don’t know anything about what goes inside, but I should probably learn what happens in that blackbox.  Finally, the best learning tool of all was learnyounode.  The reason for this is because it is called learnyounode, which automatically makes it amazing.  Plus it just gave you problems to solve using the JavaScript you hopefully know to start creating a web server.  Pretty good times.

Here’s a link to the outcome.  More importantly, here’s a link to all my testing posts.  It gets weird in all the right ways with Batman, Joker, and Robin being the stars of my tester accounts.  This page would look a lot less awkward if I tagged the users who post, but since, again, my intent is to only see MY posts alone when I sign in, I don’t see this as an issue.

I think my next step will be to start working a bit more on the app I’d like to build for my teacher friends.  I’ll need to plan out what it needs to do and how it will work a bit more first so I can get my MVC on.

Getting MEAN: Building My First Web App for Realsies (and also fries are the worst food gift)