JavaScript Card Game: The Great Dalmuti (or look Ma, I used JavaScript to make a card game my friends won’t play with me!)

Hi, my name is Stephanie, and I’m a recovering board and card game addict.  My addiction has manifested itself in some very concerning ways over the years including a stint of playing DnD with nerds online over IRC chat in college, but the most recent iteration is by writing myself a small JavaScript app version of The Great Dalmuti/Daihinmin/President.

When I am able to coerce my friends to play this game, we all wear different hats to indicate our position in society, because unlike public schools you are allowed to wear hats in my home, and at times it is required like a construction site.  Only, instead of building apartment complexes, we’re building camaraderie?  Clearly, my preference is to give the dudes in our group the pinkest, prettiest hats I can knowing that society typically doesn’t approve of them embracing their love of lightish red and wanting to give them an opportunity where they can excuse their pink-embrace as the whims of a game addict while their hearts palpitate in an elation they had never previously knew possible from headwear.

Consequently, when I threw together cards based on a stick person I was able to create using arial font, they all had different hats to help simulate this very important part of the Dalmuti experience.  My only regret is that the 12 and 11 needed far more different hats than I provided due to a lack of inspiration in the last 5 minutes of my 30 minute hat making adventure.  Which is why those will not be cards I show you intentionally.  Instead, have an apple merchant:

Or, you know, a red blob saleswoman.
Here we have an apple merchant. 

She has large feathers in her luxurious purple cap and has done well in an apple-deprived market. Apple pies, apple crisps, and apple cider are the mainstays in the realm, and she is rolling in apple dough so much her feathers are bigger than her arms. Life is good for the apple merchant.

Totally did not make her an apple merchant because apples are easily distinguishable at small sizes.  It was definitely a lore thing.  Definitely.  Same with this carrot guy.  Lore.

Or, the amazing orange stick salesman.
The carrot merchant. 

A man with small feathers to signify his small wealth in comparison to the other merchants, especially that darn apple merchant. There was a time in his life where he spent day in and day out trying to convince the members of the realm that orange is the new red, but after being threatened with incarceration by the Great Dalmuti himself, he resigned to his fewer boxes of unwanted carrots and accepted his lot in life. After all, he could be a peon.

Look at that well-developed story line.  It makes you want to play a card game with robots because your friends won’t play with you, doesn’t it?

On a more technical note, this was fun to practice for some of the different things I’ve learned and a nice break from my behavior tracker app I’m working on.  I added some changes from my original based on suggestions from friends and spouse (ex. delayed listing of what the script in the browser has played rather than it showing as it loads which is instantaneously from a person’s perspective).  There are still some aspects of the game I need to implement (wild cards, revolution, greater revolution, taxes after the 1st play through), I want to make a much better UI, and I need to refractor my code a bit more since in some places I’m pretty sure it’s a bit awkwardly put together.  I’m also likely going to put together a multiplayer version using me some node and socketIO, but that’s for later because if I could get friends to play with me in the first place I wouldn’t have needed to make a computer version.

In the mean time – hats.  Hats are the answer.

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JavaScript Card Game: The Great Dalmuti (or look Ma, I used JavaScript to make a card game my friends won’t play with me!)

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